Number of Saudi Students On U.S. College Campuses Growing

Number of Saudi Students On U.S. College Campuses Growing

Despite the negative stereotypes surrounding Saudi Arabians, many Saudis in the United States are university students. Saudi presence on American campuses has grown significantly over the past seven years. Saudis amount to 4.5 percent of international students in the country.

In universities throughout Michigan, Saudis rank fifth in the number of international students. They make up 5 percent of the State’s foreign student body.

In 2006, the Saudi Higher Education Ministry established a scholarship program to send students to universities abroad.

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November Issue: ‘Linsanity’ Revisits the Incredible Sports Phenomenon

November Issue: ‘Linsanity’ Revisits the Incredible Sports Phenomenon

It was Christmas Day, 2011, and Jeremy Lin was alone on a plane flying back home to Palo Alto, Calif. The second-year NBA player had just been placed on waivers again, this time by the Houston Rockets. Two days later, Lin learned that he had been picked up by the New York Knicks. But this was not necessarily cause for celebration. After being tossed around by teams and sent to the D-League numerous times, Lin, at this point, was frustrated, burnt out and unsure of his future in the NBA.

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Q&A: Eroding Muslim Stereotypes, with Love Stories

How To Erode Muslim Stereotypes, with Love Stories

Editor’s Note: “Love InshAllah: The Secret Love Lives of American Muslim Women,” a compilation of personal essays, was released last year and garnered positive reviews. Building on the popularity of that first volume, editors Ayesha Mattu and Nura Maznavi set out to compile a second collection, focusing on Muslim men and their personal love lives. The new book, entitled “Salaam, Love: American Muslim Men on Love, Sex, and Intimacy,” is slated for release in early 2014. Mattu spoke about the new book with New America Media reporter Semany Gashaw.

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Remembering “the mother” of Arab American Studies and Social historian Alixa Naff

Alixa Naff, considered “the mother” of Arab American Studies, established the Faris and Yamna Naff Arab American Collection at the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, D.C. In the summer of 1962, she travelled the United States in a blue Volkswagon beetle, known as “the camel,” conducting oral interviews with the first generations of Arab American immigrants and collecting their photographs and artifacts.

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Profiling A Rising African-Diasporan Filmmaker Take 2

In the year 2010 Odera Ozoka, a gifted filmmaker based in Hollywood released his feature film “Soul Diaspora” to much praise. The twenty thousand dollar movie which was shot in ten days went on to win several awards that year including the “Audience Favorite” award at the Pan African Film Festival, and ‘Best Film’ from a filmmaker in Diaspora at the African Movie Academy Awards.

As a writer/director, Soul Diaspora showed Odera’s gift for visual poetry, bringing together elements of what he loved best- fantasy mixed with a touch of neorealisms, and weaving them seamlessly to create cinematic conflicts where his characters can bond. To put it simply he had a good year in 2010.

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Sam Sarpong, Multi-faceted Cultural Icon's American Dream

Sam Sarpong, Multi-faceted Cultural Icon’s American Dream

TIM,Entertainment He is described by many as a triple threat. A Hollywood actor, singer, and one of the world’s top male supermodels, Sam Sarpong has modeled for Louis Vuitton,Marc Jacobs,Gucci and many other mainstream designers including most recently Nelson Mandela’s inspired men’s line, 466/64. Currently the new Los Angeles host of Ryan Seacrest’s new network,…

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