Growing Awareness of Appropriate Cares Among Nigerian Immigrants

Growing Awareness of Appropriate Cares Among Nigerian Immigrants

n early U.S. history during the 1600s and 1700s, Nigerians came to America as slaves. When slavery was abolished in 1865, this flow stopped.

Since the 1960s, political instability in Nigeria and economic opportunities in the U.S. have prompted many Nigerians, especially those among the educated elites and medical professionals, to seek political asylum, educational opportunities and a better life in America.

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Hemingway’s Kinship with the Spanish Endures in Idaho

Hemingway’s Kinship with the Spanish Endures in Idaho

SUN VALLEY, Idaho. The Ketchum Korral is not picturesque. It’s a group of cheap month-to-month, brown cabins clustered on the outskirts of Sun Valley. Located on Highway 75, uninformed motorists drive past it every day.

The Korall now houses the Anglos, Mexicans and Peruvians when they first arrive in Idaho searching for work. Over 80 percent of its current tenants are of Spanish descent.

Ernest Hemingway lived in these same cabins in 1946, with his wife Mary, as she recuperated from a near fatal tubal pregnancy. It was called the “MacDonald Cabins” back then and Hemingway wrote “Islands in the Stream” in cabin 38.

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Local and international interfaith leaders call for peace in light of Ferguson and New York protest in Carson

Local and international interfaith leaders call for peace in light of Ferguson and New York protest in Carson

Dec. 6, 2014 – Los Angeles, Calif. – In light of the recent Ferguson and New York protests, international non-profit organization Heavenly Culture, World Peace, and Restoration of Light (HWPL) hosted a Peace Summit of the Americas featuring religious and governmental leaders to discuss the solution for peace and social justice.

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“Florida Crackers; Culture Hangs on Despite Changing State”

“Florida Crackers; Culture Hangs on Despite Changing State”

“Contemporary Cracker culture is alive and well,” said anthropologist Dana Ste. Claire, author of “Cracker; The Cracker Culture in Florida History.” The original Florida Crackers were immigrants from the Celtic region – Scotland, Ireland, Wales, Cornwall, and the English uplands. They trickled down to Florida in the 1700’s, bringing Celtic music, later called “bluegrass,” and roving ways. Using long whips, they herded the open-range cattle and horses left behind by the Spanish in the 1500’s. The loud cracking sound the whip made as it popped in the air gave the cattlemen the name “Crackers.”

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One Chinese Elder Learns that U.S. Citizenship Doesn’t Mean Renouncing Her Homeland

One Chinese Elder Learns that U.S. Citizenship Doesn’t Mean Renouncing Her Homeland

King Man Lam Ng clearly remembers the day she passed the naturalization test for her citizenship application. “I was so nervous that I kept fiddling with the button on the plastic folder I took with me. The immigration officer who interviewed me must have been driven crazy by the noise, and she told me to stop doing that. And that made me more nervous,” said Ng.

Still she passed the test. Two weeks later, at age 70, Ng took the oath and became a U.S. citizen. “I guess by then, all the internal debating was finished. I was sure I had made the right decision,” said Ng, who is now 79.

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